Building Brains: bio-inspired computing

July 27, 2016 10:00 - 12:30 pm

About

Just two years after the world's first stored computer ran its first program at Manchester in 1948, Alan Turing published his seminal paper on "Computing Machinery and Intelligence". The paper opens with the words: I propose to consider the question, "Can machines think?". Turing then goes on to explore this question through what he calls "The Imitation Game", but which subsequent generations simply call "The Turing Test". Despite spectacular progress in the performance and efficiency of machines since Turing's time, we have yet to see any convincing demonstration of a machine that can pass his test. This would have surprised Turing - he believed that all that would be required was more memory. Although cognitive systems are beginning to display impressive environmental awareness, they do not come close to the sort of "thinking" that Turing had in mind. Perhaps the problems with true artificial intelligence are that we still really haven't worked out what natural intelligence is. Until we do, all discussion of machine intelligence and "the singularity" are specious. Based on this view, we need to return to the source of natural intelligence, the human brain.

In this session international experts will describe how they see the state-of-the-art in building machines aimed at accelerating our understanding of brain function, and discuss with the audience prospects for future progress in this exciting scientific endeavour.

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